Utilities should open up API’s to their smart meter data

Smart meter

The world of utilities is changing with the roll out of smart meters. One of the biggest changes will be the wealth of data that utility companies will suddenly be flooded with.

As we noted in a previous post on GreenMonk, Centrica has:

18 million residential accounts and one million business accounts. Right now they are billing residential accounts every three months and they are managing 75 million meter reads per annum.

With the move to smart meters, Centrica will take electricity reads every 30 minutes and gas reads once per day. This means a shift from 75 million meter reads per annum to 120 billion meter reads a year. 120 billion – that’s billion with a b. That’s a phenomenal amount of data to have to deal with.

What will utilities do with this sudden influx of data?

Apart from the traditional billing function, many utilities have no idea what, if anything, they will do with the data. And this is hardly surprising, this is a new level of energy consumption information that we have not had access to previously. And furthermore, utilities have not traditionally been in the data business.

So, what should they do with all this new data? Obviously, I have a couple of ideas (more on that later), but likely you do too, and possibly so too do some utilities.

However, to really maximise their chances of coming up with a good use of the data, it’s best to expose it to as many people as possible. Crowdsource the ideas.

Utility companies should now give serious consideration to exposing their data, anonymised, through the use of openly documented API‘s and allow developers have at it. They should then run hackathons and competitions to see who can come up with the best applications making use of the data. Why not?

A couple of ideas – how about an application to highlight exceptional energy use. For example, would customers pay an extra €1 a month to receive an alert if their elderly relative’s lights didn’t go out at 11pm, or come on again at 8am? Or for people with holiday homes, would they pay €1 a month to be alerted if the lights went on when they’re not there? Or if the electricity went off (and there was food in the freezer, or worse beer in the fridge!), for example?

If utilities were to open the data to developers, who knows what amazing ideas would emerge – developers are after all, as we are fond of saying, the New Kingmakers.

Logica’s Global Utilities Director, Nigel Spooner talks Smart Meters, Smart Grids and the DCC

At the recent Logica Utility Analyst day, I talked to Logica’s Global Utilities Director, Nigel Spooner about Smart Meters, Smart Grids and the DCC – here’s a transcription of our conversation:

Tom Raftery: Hi everyone, welcome to GreenMonk TV, I’m in the Logica building in London with Nigel Spooner. Nigel is Global Utility Director for Logica. Nigel we’ve had a bit of a discussion here during the analyst event that I have just been attending, around smart meters and smart grids. Now we’re in the middle of one of the world’s worst economic crises in a long time, why would utilities want to be spending money on rolling out smart meters?

Nigel Spooner: Yeah it’s a good question isn’t it, it is difficult when money is tight, but there are benefits to smart metering, both in terms of the consumer being able to manage their energy consumption more closely, and also in terms of the distribution companies being able to run their networks more efficiently, but also and importantly being been able to cater for consumers doing their own generation for instance with photovoltaics and also for things like incorporating electric vehicles into the network.

Tom Raftery: So this is kind of life smart grid stuff and can you give us a quick idea, I mean you talked just a little bit about it sidewise, give me kind of an overall picture of what a smart grid is?

Nigel Spooner: A smart grid is difficult to define very succinctly, but it is a distribution grid where there is much more control over the way that power flows both on to and off the grid. At the moment grids are very much one way. The power goes in from the power station, it goes through the network and into the consumer.

Increasingly we’re having to cope for the fact that the consumers themselves are generating power, they are also using things like electric vehicles which have to be charged up at particular times, they need to be controlled if the networks are not to be overloaded, and therefore the distribution grids have to be much more responsive to those loads and those demands going on them. Smart metering gives the distribution companies the opportunity to know what’s going on on that grid to a much closer degree, and in real time than they having been doing so far.

Tom Raftery: And advantages to consumers…

Nigel Spooner: To consumers the advantage is that they can get first of all more flexible tariffs, so we may be able to get tariffs that are much more aligned with the way in which we actually consume energy, rather than being just a blanket tariff that’s the same for everyone. There will be much more information on the energy that one is using, so that for instance one can see when one is going for a rather large load and to turn things off if you need to, but also there is the ability increasingly to respond to variable pricing, so that if we know for instance electricity is going to be expensive in three days time because of demands on the system, then we can react to that and make sure that our large items like air-conditioning units that’s on, do not get turned on when the price is very high. So we should be able to save both energy and money through the information that smart metering gives.

Tom Raftery: And, I’ve heard a bit about this DCC thing that’s been rolled out here in the UK, can you tell me a little bit about that?

Nigel Spooner: Well DCC is simply the organization that is going to be setup or is been setup by the British government to basically take charge of all the data that is coming off smart meters as we roll them out. This will be collected centrally and then distributed to the market participants and the view is that, that will be the most efficient way to manage this huge increase in information that smart meters are providing. By doing that it should make it easier for participants to come into the market and it should make it easier for consumers to get the best deal on their energy.

Tom Raftery: Where is Logica in all this?

Nigel Spooner: Well I’m delighted to say that all the things we’ve been talking about require relatively sophisticated information technology services to enable them to happen. Logica has for many years been in the business of providing the systems and the services that are required to make those infrastructures operate effectively and we will of course continue to do so.

Tom Raftery: Okay, great. Nigel that’s been fantastic, thanks for talking to us today.

Nigel Spooner: Thank You Tom.

Full disclosure – Logica paid my travel and accommodation to attend this event.

Logica and SAP in exclusive joint bid for UK Smart Meter data provisioning

Smart meter

The UK has an interesting Smart Meter infrastructure model. Data from all the country’s Smart Meters will flow to a centralised data repository (called the DCC), from where, energy retailers will pull the data for billing purposes. The beauty of this system is that consumers dictate who has access to their data, and so switching energy providers, is not held up by data ownership issues.

The build-out of this system is still at very early stages with RFP’s expected towards the end of the year but SAP and Logica have come out of the blocks early with an announcement that they are going to put in a joint bid to become the data service provider for the DCC.

Logica and SAP are both heavily involved in the utilities sector in the UK, so it makes sense for them to bid for this – the interesting aspect is that they agreed to bid together and that their joint bid is exclusive.

The six main suppliers in the UK are all either involved in trials, or in the process of starting to trial smart meters. All six are using Logica’s head-end system for their trials, so if Logica and SAP win the bid, the transition to the DCC system should be relatively painless.

Talking to Tara McGeehan, Logica’s Head of Utilities UK on Monday, she said that the idea behind the bid was to move the debate away from technology and comms, onto the power of the data to affect things like micro-generation, energy efficiency and smart grids.

Having seen Centrica’s Smart Meter Analytics application, which runs on SAP’s HANA, earlier this year, the proposition that there is gold in them thar data, certainly rings true.

Photo credit Tom Raftery

If Utilities don’t step up their customer communications, they risk their considerable smart grid investments

Smart meter

Smart grids don’t come cheap.

They are typically projects costing in the order of hundreds of millions of dollars (or Euro’s, or pounds or whatever your currency of choice). Just think, the most fundamental piece of the smart grid, the smart meter, alone costs in the order of $100. When you factor in the costs of installation, etc., you are looking at over $200 per smart meter. Therefore if you have in the order of one million customers it’s going to cost you around $200m just for the smart meter rollout.

Given that they are so costly to implement, you’d think utility companies would do everything possible to protect these projects from failure – not so, according to the latest smart grid research from Oracle.

The report from Oracle surveyed 150 North American C-level utility executives about their vision and priorities for smart grids over the next ten years. The findings are both interesting and disturbing.

It is interesting but not too surprising for example, that when asked to select their top two smart grid priorities over the next 10 years, they chose improving service reliability (45%) and implementing smart metering (41%) at the top of the list.

What is worrying though is that while 71% of utilities say securing customer buy-in is key to successful smart grid roll-outs, only 43% say they are educating their customers on the value proposition of smart grids. This is hugely problematic because, as I have written about previously, customer push-back can go a long way to de-railing smart grid projects.

And those who are educating their customers, how are they doing it?

Well, from the report, to communicate with their customers 76% of utilities use postal communications, and 72% use their own website. Only 20% use social media (and who knows how well those 20% are using their social media channels).

Tellingly, the report also mentions that only 38% of utility customers take advantage of energy conservation programs when they are made available. There are a number of reasons for this:

  1. the savings from these programs often require work on the part of the customer for no immediately visible benefit
  2. the savings are typically small (or put another way, energy is still too cheap) and
  3. Because of the extremely poor job utility companies have done on communications to-date, their customers don’t trust them, or their motivations. There is no quick fix for this. It will take time and a significant improvement in how utility companies converse with their customers before they start to be trusted

I have written lots of times over the years about the need for utilities to improve their communications.

Utilities have a lot of work to do rolling out their smart grids – but if they don’t step up their customer communications, they risk their considerable smart grid investments.

Photo credit Tom Raftery

Power line communications now being used in more and more scenarios

Power Line Communications

I had a nice catch-up call with Mike Holt the other day – Mike is Semitech Semiconductor’s VP Sales and Marketing and we had previously talked last August.

Mike was bringing me up to speed on what has been going on with Semitech in the last five months. Semitech make semiconductor chips specially designed for power line communications (PLC). Power line communications is essentially the use of electrical cables to transmit data.

Power line communications is receiving a lot of interest these days because of the current buzz (bad pun, sorry) around Smart Grids. Every smart meter is, by definition, connected to an electricity distribution network – if this network can be used to send and receive information, it saves having to roll out a separate infrastructure for your smart grid communications.

During our call, Mike made me aware of a number of bits of Semitech news (they’ve expanded their sales team, they had new product announcements and they closed a new funding round) but by far the more interesting part of the chat, for me, was when Mike started to tell me of the new markets that are expressing an interest in PLC.

According to Mike, there is now a growing interest in PLC coming from the urban lighting sector to help with maintenance and control of lighting. Mike gave me the example of Munich. Apparently there are five people employed in the city whose job it is to drive around the city at night spotting burnt out lights – with a PLC solution, you can receive an automatic notification as soon as your sodium lamps burn out and you get early indications that an LED is about to burn out allowing you to switch it out before it goes dark.

LED’s by themselves save large amounts of money (this is very important when urban lighting makes up to 40% of a cities energy budget) but, as we reported last year, LED’s when they are connected to an intelligent control system can save up to 87% on energy costs!

Other new markets for power line communications Mike mentioned were for remote management of solar panels on remote solar farms and seemingly there is a growing interest in PLC in the home automation field – which makes a lot of sense too.

Power line communications is not without its challenges – electrical networks can be ‘noisy’ and be prone to attenuation but as companies like Semitech become better at dealing with those issues, it is going to be fascinating to see just where PLC takes us.

Photo credit Ruud Hein

Friday Green Numbers round-up 09/03/2010

Green Numbers

Photo credit trindade.joao

And here is this week’s Green numbers:

  • ?There?ve been multiple gigawatts of solar thermal power plants planned for various places in the California desert for some time, but finally some more of them are getting the approvals need so that construction can start: The US Bureau of Land Management has issued a final environmental impact statement for the 1,000 MW Blythe Solar Power Project; and the 250 MW Beacon Solar Energy project has received final California state approval as well.
    The smaller of the two first: Renewable Energy World reports NextEra Energy Resources has been given the green light by the California Energy Commission to begin construction on the 250 MW Beacon Solar Energy project.

  • Researchers at Columbia University have demonstrated that a layer of plants and earth can cut the rate of heat absorption through the roof of a building in summer by 84%

    Perhaps the greatest overall benefit of green roofs comes in tackling the “urban heat island” effect, which Gaffin suggests is responsible for two-thirds of New York’s localized warming over the last century. The conventional black rooftops that he calls “tar beaches” are major contributors to this phenomenon, absorbing and re-radiating the sun’s energy as heat. “We’re going to want to cool regional climate down, especially where people are living,” Gaffin noted. “So we’re going to have to confront the urban heat island effect.”

    While conventional roofs can reach temperatures of 80 ?C at 1.00 p.m. even outside of high summer, green roofs always stay closer to ambient temperatures. “These [conventional roofs] are almost dangerously hot spaces,” Gaffin told environmentalresearchweb. “That’s a huge heat load that we can get rid of.”

    Plants in green roofs regulate their temperatures through evapotranspiration. “They evaporate copious amounts of water,” Gaffin explained. “That takes a lot of energy and means it’s a great way to stay cool.”

  • Energy efficiency is THE core climate solution. It’s the biggest low-carbon resource by far. “Efficiency Works” [PDF], a major new report by Bracken Hendricks, Bill Campbell, and Pen Goodale, finds that a straightforward set of policies aimed at upgrading just 40 percent of the residential and commercial building stock in the United States would:

    1. Create 625,000 sustained full-time jobs over a decade.
    2. Spark $500 billion in new investments to upgrade 50 million homes and office buildings.
    3. Generate as much as $64 billion a year in cost savings for U.S. ratepayers, freeing consumers to spend their money in more productive ways.

  • Cisco this morning announced its intent to acquire privately-held Arch Rock, which specializes in IP-based wireless sensor network technology with a focus on energy and environmental monitoring and Smart Grid applications.

    Financial terms of the transaction are not being disclosed.

  • ONE of the curiosities of carbon markets is that they do not just trade in carbon. Other greenhouse gases can be given a value, too?sometimes a very high one. Claims that these prices promote scammery are now prompting some searching questions.

    The gas at the centre of the controversy is HFC-23, a greenhouse gas which, on a weight-for-weight basis, is 14,800 times better at trapping heat than carbon dioxide. HFC-23 is produced as a by-product of the manufacture of HCFC-22, an ozone-destroying refrigerant. HCFC-22 is banned in developed countries, but developing countries can keep making it until 2030.

    The acronyms do not end there. Under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) of the United Nations HCFC-22 producers in developing countries that destroy, rather than release, their HFC-23 can be eligible for Certified Emission Reduction (CER) credits, which can then be traded in the European Union?s emissions-trading scheme. This allows companies to buy extra emissions reductions to meet their cap-and-trade obligations, and in so doing to transfer money to schemes reducing emissions in developing countries.

  • A page showing and explaining in-depth the real-time energy use (electricity & gas) of UK govt buildings at 3-8 Whitehall place

  • Iberdrola Renovables, in consortium with Neoenergia, has been awarded the contract for nine new wind farms in Brazil, with total installed capacity of 258 MW. It is the second contract to develop renewable energy that the company has won in Brazil.

    The contract award took place in Rio de Janeiro, during the second tender process for renewable energies in the country, organised by the Agencia Nacional de Energ?a El?ctrica (Aneel).

    Iberdrola Renovables has committed to supply the electricity generated at these facilities to the Brazilian government for a 20-year period, starting in January 2013. The annual amount of the contract awarded yesterday by Aneel is about ?60 million (130 million reales).

  • PG&E is handing over tens of thousands of dollars to the nonprofit Sempervirens Fund to protect a 425-acre stand of redwoods once slated for logging deep in the Santa Cruz Mountains.

    The deal, expected to be completed next month, is part of the utility’s efforts to combat greenhouse gas emissions, in this case safeguarding trees for carbon absorption, and is helping to drive a new marketplace where people and business are offered an incentive to offset pollution.

    “We’re finding a new financial model here for doing things to capture greenhouse gases that wouldn’t have been done otherwise,” said Robert Parkhurst, climate protection and analysis manager for PG&E.

    “It’s a new paradigm for protecting the environment.”

  • More companies trading in carbon offsets and those financing emissions reduction projects are setting up shop in?Singapore.

    More than 30 such carbon-related firms have done so in the last three years or?so.

    The trade in carbon credits, worth US$153 billion (S$208 billion) globally last year, is driven by various requirements to cut back on greenhouse gas emissions. These include cap-and-trade regulations in Europe and countries scrambling to fulfil carbon emissions obligations under the United Nations? Kyoto Protocol.

  • And you thought John Deere was all about tractors. This morning utility Exelon said it will buy up the wind power division of John Deere, called John Deere Renewables, for $860 million, plus an additional $40 million once all of the projects are completed. John Deere Renewables has 965 MW of clean power projects under development in various stages.

  • The immensely popular LCDs screens that are found everywhere in the modern home (television, computer, laptop, cellphones, etc) use less energy than CRTs, the previous technology, but they are still far from being optimally efficient. Only about 8% of the light emitted by a LCD’s backlight makes its way out, and the rest is wasted. But that might be about to change thanks to a new filter that could boost that efficiency by more than 400% and allow around 36% of the light to pass through.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Smart Grid Heavy Hitters – Dr Ann Cavoukian, Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario, Canada

I recently had an opportunity to interview Dr Ann Cavoukian, the Information and Privacy Commissioner for Ontario, Canada about Smart Grid data privacy. Commissioner Cavoukian has written and presented extensively about Smart Grid privacy. She is also the author of a white paper on Smart Grid privacy called SmartPrivacy for the Smart Grid and Dr. Cavoukian partnered with two major utilities to develop a practical roadmap for utilities to achieve the gold standard in data protection (Privacy by Design: Achieving the Gold Standard in Data Protection for the Smart Grid).

Here is the full transcription of our chat:

Tom Raftery: Hi everyone, and welcome to the Smart Grid Heavy Hitter Series. My guest on the program, today, is Commissioner Ann Cavoukian, the Information and Privacy Commissioner for Ontario. Commissioner, I?m curious, why is the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario concerned about Smart Grids?

Commissioner Cavoukian: Well, I always say that in order to protect the privacy of the citizens of Ontario, I have to protect the privacy of people anywhere in the world. Privacy knows no bounds and technology transcends jurisdiction. So, whatever new technologies arise that have privacy implications, we need to get right in there and ensure as much as we can that protections are built into, especially, new technologies and new developments like the smart grid. The ideal opportunity to protect privacy is at the outset and ideally embed privacy into the design of new technologies like the smart grid.

Tom Raftery: Why is there a concern at all about privacy and smart grids? What?s the danger?

Commissioner Cavoukian: Anytime that there?s the possibility of collecting personally identifiable information either directly or through some data linkage to it, privacy enters into the equation.

So, with the smart grid you start with smart meters. And I should tell you that here in Toronto, Ontario we are leading in the smart grid, smart meter applications. By the end of this year, all houses in Toronto will have smart grids and in Ontario by the end of 2012. So, it?s widespread application.

Now, what smart girds enable the utility to do is to on a real time basis go in to your home and give you a very clear indication of your electricity usage, which is very good because it will promote energy consumption reduction, and a number of other programs – this is all very positive. As long as the information is kept between the electrical utility and the consumer, there?s no issue. It?s no different than now so to speak.

However, with the possibility of third parties being interested in this information, the possibility of unauthorized data usage of this information there?s link to an identifiable individual and with the growth of smart appliances – your computer, your television, your refrigerator; everything is going to be telling you and telling the utility what you?re doing, when you?re doing at, at what times – this introduces a whole new element of potential profiling of a consumer?s activities within the household, which is after all your castle, right? Your home is sacrosanct.

No one has been able to peer into the activities within the home before now. They?ll be able to do that. So, we have to ensure that this information is protected like Fort Knox.

Tom Raftery: How widespread are the concerns? How many people are aware that this is an issue and how are people trying to deal with that issue?

Commissioner Cavoukian: And you are absolutely right. About a year, a year-and-a-half ago I did an article. And I call privacy the sleeper issue of the smart grid; because certainly last year not a lot of activity associated with this area, but I can tell you that in the past year the interest has grown dramatically.

In Canada, we have jurisdiction over electrical utilities. So, I?ve been working with Hydro One, here, in Ontario, Canada and Toronto Hydro and they not only understand the issues, of course, they?re regulated. I oversee complaints with these two utilities; however, I want to tell people – don?t rely on regulation.

I want to exceed regulation. I want appeal to electrical utilities that in order for the smart grid to work you need consumers to sign up and to become involved, you need to build trust and consumer confidence.

The way you do that is by ensuring that they know what you?re doing as an utility, they know what information you have from them, and most important, you are not going to disclose this information, you?re not going to share it with any third parties without their consent – this is big.

So, my appeal to utilities, and I?ve been working with utilities throughout North America and the US Smart Grid Alliance. I?m an active member there.

My pitch to them, is do this because it?s good for your utility, because you want to get the buy-in of consumers, you want to get their cooperation, you must have their trust, you must have their confidence.

So, by embedding privacy into the design of the smart grid you will be able to grow your smart grid in a way that attracts more consumers to it and that?s the win-win proposition of this.

Tom Raftery: It?s great that you?re telling utilities this. What are they actually doing? Are they taking what you say on board, are they saying, ?Oh! Commissioner, Cavoukian is a nut case and we?ll just put her concerns to one side,? or are there a range of reactions?

Commissioner Cavoukian: Well, I am sure it is some of them think I am a nut case, I give you that, but I think the majority the ones who have reached out to us have been actually quite positive about our approach.

They?ve actually given me a complement and they?ve said, ?You?re not like most regulators we know.? And I take that as a complement, because once there?s — my message to utilities and to everyone is do a positive-sum paradigm not a zero-sum paradigm.

By that, I mean, I definitely want you always to protect the privacy. I don?t care if you?re the private sector, the public sector. If you?re doing individual?s personally identifiable information you must protect that information.

However, I don?t say protected to the exclusion of your own interests, your business interests. You have a business model, it has to survive, and hopefully strive. In this case, with the smart gird electrical utilities want to grow this in an effort to promote conservation of energy, grow green programs, reduce reduction, consumption of energy, empowering your users your users. We are all for that; so we?re not doing this — we?re not saying protect the privacy to the exclusion of those interests, not at all.

We?re saying you can do both. We show you how to do both by embedding privacy into the design of the smart grid, and I should tell you it?s at the ideal time. This is the time to do it when you?re at the nascent stage. It?s at it?s infancy, the smart grid development, starting with the smart meters and I?m not giving you a pie in the sky. I?m telling you how to do it in a very defined way. We?ve worked with Hydro One, for example, and Toronto Hydro.

We have two papers that we?ve produced that are available on our website. This one, the latest one with Hydro One is called, ?Achieving the Gold Standard in Data Protection for the Smart Grid?.

So, we?re trying to get people to reach for the sky on this in terms of doing it now, embed privacy, and we tell you how to do it. This is best practices on exactly how to do it and we do it in partnership with an electrical utility. So, we give you the road map on how to do this and also respect privacy and enhance your business interests, positive-sum win-win.

Tom Raftery: Commissioner, we?re running low on time, so one final question. Is there anything about privacy on smart grids that I haven?t asked you that you would like to address?

Commissioner Cavoukian: Just one final point for the people listening to this. I would like them to view the smart grid and how to protect information in a way that is not the usual ?who owns the data?. The question of ownership often comes up and I?m going to suggest to you that?s the wrong language to frame this in.

When you talk about privacy and personally identifiable information, data protection you use the language sort of bundles of rights associated with that information. It?s the language of custody and control of the information as opposed to ownership; because it?ll be easy for the utility to say, ?You know, it?s our data, we collect it, and then you get mired into this whole legalese about who owns the data. It?s not one of ownership.

Of course, the utility is collecting the data, they?re providing a service to consumers, and there?s an exchange of information. I think it?s better to talk about what obligations and duties are associated with that.

So, for a utility, who has custody and control over the data they also have a duty of care and obligations with respect to protecting that data, they have a duty of care, confidentiality, and ensuring that the consumer not only knows what you?re doing. So, you?re transparent with respect to your practices, but they have access to their own data and ideally they have full ability to say no, no third party use of its data unless I consent to it.

That?s the Gold Standard and that?s what I?m hoping that, that language will be embraced in this area.

Tom Raftery: Commissioner, thanks a million for coming on the show.

Smart Grid Heavy Hitters – Jon Wellinghoff, Chair of US Federal Energy Regulatory Commission – part 1

Jon Wellinghoff is the Chairman of the United States Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) – the FERC is the agency that regulates the interstate transmission of electricity, natural gas, and oil. As such, the FERC was the agency which Google Energy applied to for its licence to buy and sell electricity on the wholesale market, for example.

Shortly after his appointment as Chair of the FERC in 2009 by Barack Obama, Chairman Wellinghoff made headlines when he said

No new nuclear or coal plants may ever be needed in the United States… renewables like wind, solar and biomass will provide enough energy to meet baseload capacity and future energy demands

A chance came up recently to have him on this show, so I obviously jumped at it!

We had a great chat – so good, in fact that I turned it into two shows rather than edit any of it out.

In this first video we discussed:

  • What a smart grid is and its benefits
  • The backlash to early smart grid rollouts in Texas and California
  • How long it will be before we see full smart grids deployments

I will publish the second part of the interview next week.

In part two Chairman Wellinghoff will once again state that the US does not need to build any more coal or nuclear power plants, that renewables can meet the energy requirements of the US and he will discuss how electric car owners in some trials are being paid over $3,000 per annum for use of their batteries for grid regulation services by their utilities!

Smart Grid Heavy Hitter series – Ahmad Faruqui

Ahmad Faruqui is a principal with the Brattle Group and one of the US’ foremost experts on Smart Grids. I asked him to come on the Heavy Hitters show and we had a fascinating chat.

We talked about:

  • Ahmad’s definition of a Smart Grid
  • People seeing higher utility bills as a result of the rollout of Smart Meters
  • How much the Smart Grid will cost
  • Who is going to pay for the Smart Grid
  • How long before we see Smart Grids being rolled out

Smart Grid Heavy Hitter series – Chris King, Chief Regulatory officer, eMeter

eMeter provide software for utilities who are rolling out Smart Grids to help with Meter Data Management and real-time pricing visibility. Chris King is their Chief Regulatory Officer and he and I had a great chat recently about Smart Grids.

We talked about:

  • Chris and eMeter’s definition of a Smart Grid
  • Why eMeter need a Chief Regulatory Officer
  • Regional differences in regulation of Smart Grids and
  • A recent survey that showed 55% of utilities have yet to start Smart Grid rollouts